PKI Consortium blog

Posts by tag Mixed Content

Chrome Kills Mixed Content for HTTPS
December 6, 2019 by Bruce Morton (Entrust) Attack Chrome Firefox Mixed Content Policy SSL/TLS
In a phased approach, Chrome plans to block mixed content on secure websites to improve user security. Most browsers already block some mixed content such as scripts and iframes by default. Chrome is amping it up by gradually taking steps to also block images, audio recordings and videos, according to a recent Google Security blog. Preventing mixed content to load will eventually result in HTTPS websites losing their security indicator downgrading the site to HTTP, which alerts visitors that the site is not secure.

Always-On SSL
September 30, 2016 by Rick Andrews, Ben Wilson Encryption Firefox Google Identity Microsoft Mixed Content OpenSSL Policy Qualified SSL/TLS
There is no doubt that content owners and publishers have a duty to encourage trust and the confidence during internet usage by adopting security best practices. If a customer believes that their data and identity are safe and protected, they are more inclined to continue their online transactions. Industry best practices for website protection should be vendor-neutral, easy to implement, and globally accessible. Websites should take all the reasonable steps possible to adopt best practices in secure design and implementation, and this includes using Always-On SSL across the entire website.

Moving to Always on HTTPS, Part 2 of 2; Upgrading to HTTP Strict Transport Security
February 18, 2016 by Ben Wilson HSTS Mixed Content Policy SSL/TLS Vulnerability W3C
Part 1 of this blog post discussed browser security indicators and how to avoid getting warnings about mixed content on your website. (Mixed content leaves a door open that allows an attacker to snoop or inject malicious content during the browsing session.) This Part 2 discusses other technical measures to implement Always on HTTPS. As I noted previously, one of the difficulties with implementing Always on HTTPS is that content is often provided by third parties.

Moving to Always on HTTPS, Part 1 of 2; Marking HTTP as Unsecure
February 3, 2016 by Ben Wilson Chrome Firefox Google HSTS Malware Mixed Content Mozilla SSL/TLS Vulnerability
Over the past several years there has been increased discussion about deprecating HTTP and making HTTPS the default protocol for the World Wide Web. (HTTP stands for “HyperText Transfer Protocol” and the “S” in HTTPS is enabled with an SSL/TLS digital certificate properly installed and configured on a web server.) These discussions have taken place in the context of browser security indications and technical improvements simplifying the global movement to “Always on HTTPS.

Lenovo Enables Man-in-the-Middle Attacks Via Superfish Adware
February 20, 2015 by Doug Beattie (GlobalSign) Attack Code Signing Firefox Malware Microsoft MITM Mixed Content SSL/TLS Vulnerability
Lenovo is selling computers that contain the Superfish application which “supplements” the user’s SSL sessions to enable their adware application to deliver content transparently; however, due to poor security design this leaves users vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks. How it was supposed to work Superfish uses the program “Visual Discovery” to process images in browser content and then displays ads for similar goods and services. This sounds like any other adware application, but in order to maintain SSL sessions and not alert users with security warnings, Superfish is serving up these images over https.

Always-On SSL, Part II
February 5, 2014 by Ben Wilson Encryption Firefox Mixed Content Policy Qualified SSL/TLS
The SSL/TLS protocol has more to offer than just providing you with transmission encryption. Its main benefit is that it provides a way for third parties to authenticate connections to your website over the Internet. A user who can connect to your site and retrieve information via SSL/TLS will have greater assurance and trust that information came from you. The point of Always-On SSL is that once a user is able to create an authenticated connection to your point of presence via https, then he or she should not be bounced back outside of that zone of protection.

Always-On SSL, Part I
January 16, 2014 by Rick Andrews Encryption Google Identity Microsoft Mixed Content OpenSSL SSL/TLS
There is no doubt that content owners and publishers have a duty to encourage trust and the confidence during internet usage by adopting security best practices. If a customer believes that their data and identity are safe and protected, they are more inclined to continue their online transactions. Industry best practices for website protection should be vendor-neutral, easy to implement, and globally accessible. Websites should take all the reasonable steps possible to adopt best practices in secure design and implementation, and this includes using Always-On SSL across the entire website.

Firefox 23 Blocks Mixed Content
August 13, 2013 by Wayne Thayer Chrome Encryption EV Firefox Google Malware Mixed Content Mozilla SSL/TLS
The latest version of the Firefox Web browser from Mozilla was released on August 6th with a great new security feature called a “mixed content blocker”. In a nutshell, this feature ensures that all of the parts of a secure Website are indeed encrypted via SSL certificates. All of the data on the website is prevented from being intercepted, and it becomes more difficult to add malware into the site’s content.

Getting the Most Out of SSL Part 3: Optimization
July 29, 2013 by Rick Andrews, Ryan Hurst MITM Mixed Content SSL/TLS
To get the most out of SSL/TLS, you need to do a bit more than just configure your web server with an SSL certificate. The information below will help you optimize your website’s use of SSL. Making the changes suggested below will also help move your site towards “Always On SSL” (https://otalliance.org/resources/AOSSL/index.html), a best practice in which you serve the entire contents of your website over SSL/TLS. Changes to the content of your website Some HTML tags can include attributes that are links or paths to other pages on your site.

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